Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (2022)

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (1)

by Andy Warhol 1979 Corbis #AALX001432

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (2)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1964. Photo booth photograph, 6 x 1 5/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (3)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1973. Polaroid Type SX-70, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (4)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1979. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (5)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1971. Polaroid glued to board, 4 ¼ x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (6)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1986. Polacolor ER, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (7)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait in Drag, 1981. Black and white print, 8 x 10 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (8)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1973. Polaroid Type SX-70, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (9)

Andy Warhol, Self-portait, 1980. Black and white print, 10 x 8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (10)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1979. Large-format Polaroid, 20 x 24 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Andy Warhol changed the way we look at the world, and the way the world looks at art. With his exhaustive observation of cultural trends, from his rise to Pop art fame in the early 1960s up until his death in 1987, he identified the images and aesthetics shaping the consumer-driven postwar American experience, and transformed what he saw into a sophisticated yet accessible body of work. He invented new ways of image making, vastly expanding what was considered fine art, and also a new kind of artist, one who merged art and life, and treated painting, photography, filmmaking, writing, publishing, advertising, branding, performance, video, television, digital media—and even his own persona—as equally valid terrain for creative experimentation. Often lost in his own celebrity and myth is the fact that he is widely considered one of the most important postwar artists of the 20th century.

“Isn’t life a series of images that change as they repeat themselves?”

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol was born Andrew Warhola in 1928 in Pittsburgh to Julia and Andrej Warhola, Carpatho-Rusyn immigrants and devout Byzantine Catholics who had fled poverty and war in current-day Slovakia. Although his childhood was economically impoverished by many standards, Warhol’s talent was well-nourished. As a child, he was struck with a nervous-system disorder that left him homebound for months, during which time his mother furnished him with art supplies, as well as comic books and movie magazines—the grist of future fixations. He attended free art classes at the Carnegie Museum, and was the first in his family to go to college, earning a degree in Pictorial Design from the Carnegie Technical Institute (now Carnegie Mellon University) in 1949, and establishing a reputation as a talented non-conformist along the way.


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (11)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1958. Polaroid Type 42, 4 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (12)

Andy Warhol, Reclining Male Nude, 1950s. Black ballpoint pen on manila paper, 16 3/4 x 13 7/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (13)

Andy Warhol, Untitled (Cat From 25 Cats Name Sam and One Blue Pussy), mid 1950s. Ink and Dr.Martin's Aniline Dye on Strathmore paper, 22 7/8 x 14 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (14)

Andy Warhol, So Many Stars, late 1950s. Ink and tempera on ivy paper, 9 7/8 x 12 1/2 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (15)

Andy Warhol, Kyoto, Japan, July 3, 1956, 1956. Offset lithograph and watercolor on paper, 17 3/8 x 14 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol moved to New York City at age 21 hoping to succeed as a commercial designer. His success was swift: Within days he was illustrating stylish women’s shoes for a spread in Glamour magazine, and by 1952 he had won his first of many industry awards. Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Bergdorf Goodman, Tiffany & Co., and Columbia Records are among the many prestigious firms that kept him flush through the 1950s.

As he courted clients on Madison Avenue and busily navigated the social geography of Manhattan’s fashion world and urbane gay community, Warhol continued making art. He developed a distinctive language of lively motifs—cherubs, butterflies, cats, shoes, food, elegant women, young men kissing—often collaborating with writers to produce artist’s books, which were among the many objects he’d gift to friends and colleagues over the years.


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (16)

Andy Warhol, Shoes, 1960s. Ink wash and tempera on Strathmore paper, 23 x14 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (17)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1964. Photo-booth photographs, 3 15/16 x 1 9/16 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (18)

Andy Warhol, Charles Lisanby, mid 1950s. Black ballpoint pen on paper, 16 3/4 x 13 7/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (19)

(Video) BIG UPDATES: Warhol v. Goldsmith

Andy Warhol, D'Orsay, mid-1950s. Black ballpoint pen on manila paper, 16 x 7/8 x 13 3/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (20)

Andy Warhol, Ice Cream Dessert, late-1950s. Ink and Dr Martin's Aniline dye on Strathmore paper, 29 x 23 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (21)

Andy Warhol, Gold Leaf Nude, 1957. Gold leaf and ink on paper, 17 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (22)

Andy Warhol, Bodley Gallery Announcement, 1957. Offset lithograph on paper, 4 x 6 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol’s fashionable sought-after style looked different than other illustrations, characterized by his jagged “blotted line,” which he achieved by pressing paper to a wet ink drawing to create a blotchier duplicate. As curator Donna De Salvo has pointed out, the duplicate looked simultaneously handmade and mass-produced – an appealing duality long at the core of Warhol’s aesthetic. That simple form of printing foreshadowed the radical experiments with silkscreening that he’d use to forever transform the look and feel of painting.

By the late 1950s, Warhol had earned enough as an illustrator to purchase a townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, and to fill it with American antiques and folk art. He also began collecting work by his contemporaries, including Jasper Johns, Ray Johnson, and Frank Stella, whose vanguard ranks he aspired to join. Although a regular visitor to the city’s progressive galleries, where Pop Art was beginning to percolate, Warhol was also somewhat of an art world outsider—“too swish,” as he later described, for the more discreetly gay social circle of Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. Neither his homoerotic drawings nor his comic-book inspired images caught on, and Warhol faced a number of rejections from dealers. But his Campbell Soup Cans were a different story. When dealer Irving Blum of the cutting-edge Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles spotted the paintings during a studio visit, he offered Warhol a solo exhibition on the spot. He created 32 Campbell’s Soup Cans for the 1962 show, each a different variety, hand-painted to mimic the uniformity of mass production. He described the canvases as “portraits”—a genre he’d continue to explore in depth for the next 35 years.

“Being good in business is the most fascinating kind of art”

Andy Warhol, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (From A to B and Back Again)

In his hunt to capture the look and feel of commercialized postwar America, Warhol began experimenting with the tools of mechanical reproduction, namely, the photo-silkscreening technique. He quickly invented what would become his signature style–a grainy black image printed repeatedly–in series, grids, rows, or pairs–on painted canvas often strikingly colored. It was a game-changing artistic breakthrough, for him and for future artists, legitimizing the commercial method for use in fine art.

In 1963, with his painting practice expanding, Warhol moved his studio from a rented firehouse to a fifth-floor loft on East 47th Street that once housed a hat factory. He christened the space the Factory, covered all its surfaces in silver, and watched it morph into a hive of countercultural activity. Although infamous for its louche and drug-fueled parties, the Factory was the site of enormous creative productivity. Warhol purchased his first movie camera in 1963 and kept it rolling, innovating unprecedented genres of filmmaking, like the silent, moving portraits of his Screen Tests (1963–66) and the eight-hour single shot of Empire (1964), and inventing a new kind of celebrity, the untrained actor-turned-Superstar.


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (23)

Stephen Shore, Andy Warhol on set of My Hustler, Fire Island, New York, 1965-67. © Stephen Shore. Courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (24)

Andy Warhol, Empire, 1964. Film still. ©The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (25)

Andy Warhol, Gerard Malanga, 1963. Polaroid Type 47, 4 1/3 x 3 1/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (26)

Andy Warhol, Listerine Bottle, 1963. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 30 x 20 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (27)

Andy Warhol, Screen Test: Edie Sedwick, 1965. Film still. ©The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (28)

Andy Warhol, Superman, 1962. Casein and wax crayon on cotton duck, 67 x 52 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (29)

Andy Warhol, Screen Test: Marcel Duchamp, 1966. Film still. ©The Andy Warhol Museum.

Amid all the cinematic output, Warhol was also producing art day and night. He set up an assembly line type of system that could replicate the uniformity and seriality of mass production and enlisted Factory hands in the process of silkscreening dozens of product cartons and celebrity portraits. While he famously told Artnews in 1963 that “the reason I’m painting this way is that I want to be a machine,” every canvas Warhol silkscreened was unique, the result of creative decisions concerning composition, format, and color.

The public first encountered Warhol’s Factory-made works in 1964, in an exhibition at New York’s Stable Gallery, which he transformed into a grocery storeroom with narrow rows of stacked silkscreened Brillo Boxes and other “cartons.” Crowds lined up to see the show, but the works barely sold. They did, however, convince several influential critics of Warhol’s artistic import, including Arthur Danto, who went on to champion him as one of the 20th century’s great cultural catalysts. Warhol’s work declared once and for all that art shall no longer be defined by traditional conventions.


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (30)

Andy Warhol, Brillo Box, 1964. Silkscreen ink on wood, 20 x 20 x 27 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (31)

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (32)

Stephen Shore, Andy Warhol and Gerard Malanga, the Factory, New York, New York. 1965-67. © Stephen Shore. Courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (33)

Andy Warhol, Blue Liza as Cleopatra, 1962. Acrylic, silkscreen ink, and pencil on linen, 82 1/4 x 65 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (34)

Andy Warhol, Campbells Tomato Juice Box, 1967. Silkscreen ink on wood, 10 x 19 x 9 1/2 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (35)

Andy Warhol, Big Torn Campbells Soup Can (Pepper Pot), 1962. Casein and pencil on cotton, 71 5/8 x 52 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (36)

Stephen Shore, Andy Warhol, The Factory, New York, NY, 1965-67. © Stephen Shore. Courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (37)

Andy Warhol, Green Coca-Cola Bottles, 1962. Acrylic, silkscreen ink, and pencil on linen, 81 1/2 x 57 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

(Video) The Case For Andy Warhol | The Art Assignment | PBS Digital Studios

If his grocery cartons telegraphed the fabricated exuberance of consumerism, Warhol’s celebrity portraits and “Death and Disasters” (1963–64) revealed a darker side of the American Dream. Images of Elizabeth Taylor painted when she was ill in the hospital; Marilyn Monroe, just months after her suicide; and Jackie Kennedy, shortly after John F. Kennedy’s assassination all magnified the mass media’s unseemly yet seductive celebrity worship and fascination with human suffering. His concurrent Car Crashes, Suicides, Electric Chairs, and Race Riot paintings appropriated grisly images from tabloids and magazines, amplifying the media’s normalization of tragedy. As he told ARTnews in 1963, “When you see a gruesome picture over and over again, it really doesn’t have any effect.”


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (38)

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 1967. Silkscreen ink on paper, 36 x 36 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (39)

Andy Warhol. Little Race Riot, 1964. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, four panels at 30 x 33 inches each. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (40)

Stephen Shore, Andy Warhol, the Factory, New York, New York, 1965-67. © Stephen Shore. Courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (41)

Andy Warhol, Sixteen Jackie, 1964. Silkscreen ink on linen, 80 x 64 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (42)

Andy Warhol, Little Electric Chair, 1964 - 65. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (43)

Andy Warhol, Vinyl, 1965. Film still. © The Andy Warhol Museum

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (44)

Andy Warhol, Purple Jumping Man, 1963. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 90 1/2 x 79 1/2 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (45)

Andy Warhol, Kitchen, 1965. Film still. © The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (46)

Andy Warhol, Five Deaths, 1963. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 20 1/8 x 30 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Photography was fundamental to the way Warhol saw the world, and the way he made art. The moving image was equally vital to his artistic practice — so much so, that in 1965 he announced his retirement from painting to focus on filmmaking. From 1963 through ’68 he produced nearly 650 underground films. His first commercial success, The Chelsea Girls (1966), an unedited glimpse into the daily lives of several Superstars, is considered an influential forerunner of reality TV.

Always open to experimenting with unconventional artistic formats, Warhol turned his attention in 1966 to the band the Velvet Underground, directing their live performances as a psychedelic multi-media show with special light and film effects, and producing their first album. He remained engaged with the music industry, in one form or another, for the rest of his life.


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (47)

StephenShore, Andy Warhol, Sam Green, Marcel Duchamp, Cordier Ekstrom Gallery, New York, New York, 1965 - 67. © Stephen Shore. Courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (48)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1966. Acrylic, and silkscreen ink on linen, 22 x 22 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (49)

Andy Warhol, The Velvet Underground and Nico, 1966. Film still. ©The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (50)

Andy Warhol, The Chelsea Girls, 1966. Film still.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (51)

Andy Warhol, My Hustler, 1965. Film still. ©The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (52)

Andy Warhol, Late Four Foot Flowers, 1967. Acrylic, silkscreen ink and pencil on linen, 48 x 48 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (53)

Stephen Shore, Andy Warhol, Fire Island, New York, 1965-67. © Stephen Shore. Courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (54)

Andy Warhol, Lonesome Cowboys, 1967-68. Film still. © The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (55)

Andy Warhol, Silver Clouds, 1966. Metalized polyesther film with helium, 39 x 59 x 15 inches approximately. Installation view at Leo Castelli Gallery, New York.

He also returned to portraiture, plunging into the lucrative business of painting private commissions through the 1970s and ‘80s. Hundreds of sitters — from wealthy patrons and celebrities to other noteworthy subjects, including fellow artists, transgender models (Ladies and Gentlemen, 1975), and athletes (1977-79) — posed for Warhol’s Polaroid Big Shot, whose instamatic photos the artist translated into paint.

Between portrait commissions, European film shoots, and international exhibition openings, Warhol was at the center of a star-studded crowd as he made his way from dinner tables in Paris, Rome, and the White House to cocktail tables at Studio 54. If the look and feel of that chapter of the 20th century is embedded in the public imagination, it’s in part because Warhol routinely chronicled it. He had several love interests over his lifetime, but his most steadfast “date,” as he called it, was his camera. He kept a Polaroid close for decades — snapping shots of everything, including himself, in dozens of self-portraits that foreshadow the selfie phenomenon. In 1976, he acquired the first of several compact 35 mm cameras, and over the next 11 years shot around 130,000 black-and-white images, claiming that “having a few rolls of film to develop gives me a good reason to get up in the morning.”


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (56)

Andy Warhol, View from 33 Union Square West, New York City, 1972. Polacolor Type 108, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (57)

Andy Warhol, Pat Hackett and Jed Johnson, 1972. Polacolor Type 108, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

(Video) 'The Andy Warhol Diaries' Celebrates the Artist's Mystery

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (58)

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (59)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1969. Polacolor Type 108, 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (60)

Andy Warhol, Sofia Loren and Carlo Ponti, Villa Mandorli, Rome, 1973. Polaroid Type SX-70, 4 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (61)

Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentleman (EM), 1974. Polacolor Type 108, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (62)

Andy Warhol, Brigid Berlin, 1970. Polacolor Type 108, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (63)

Andy Warhol, Jackie Rogers, Rex Reed and Sylvia Miles, Rome, 1972. Polacolor Type 208, 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (64)

Andy Warhol, Fred Hughes, 1970. Polacolor Type 108, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (65)

Andy Warhol, Jed Johnson, 1970. Polacolor Type 108, 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (66)

Andy Warhol, Jonah Mekas and Gerard Malanga, 1969. Polacolor Type 108, 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (67)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1970s. Color print, 3 1/2 x 4 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol likened picture-taking to keeping a “visual diary.” He also tape-recorded around 4,000 hours of conversations throughout his lifetime, and in the 1970s began keeping a written diary and videotaping segments of his studio practice called “Factory Diaries.” In 1974, he began pushing this archival impulse even further with the first of more than 600 “Time Capsules” — cartons filled regularly with select bits of detritus and ephemera from the studio, including correspondence, receipts, newspapers, photographs, and souvenirs.

This exhaustive diaristic activity reveals an artist who was continuously observing the world around him, and finding the fleeting and insignificant as worthy of recording as the spectacularly glamorous — something he’d made clear in his earlier days of painting Soup Cans and Marilyns. But his desire to preserve the ephemeral was also prophetic, uncannily anticipating today’s compulsion to chronicle life on social media.


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (68)

Andy Warhol, Factory Diary, Andy Warhol on Phone, 1978. Video still. © The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (69)

Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentlemen (Wilhelmina Ross), 1975. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 14 x 11 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (70)

HyperFocal: 0

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (71)

Andy Warhol, Chris Evert, 1977. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 40 x 40 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (72)

Andy Warhol, Untitled, 1979. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (73)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrati with Polaroid Camera, 1972. Color print, 4 7/8 x 3 1/2 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (75)

Andy Warhol, Studio 54, 1978. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (76)

Andy Warhol, Studio 54, mid-1970s. Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 21 x 14 x 3/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (77)

Andy Warhol, Bob Colacello, 1977. Polacolor 2, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (78)

Andy Warhol, Untitled (Mylar and Plexiglass Construction), 1970s. Three rolls of colored Mylar, each mounted on cardboard tubes, Plexiglas slabs, rollers and pegs, 46 x 36 3/4 x 12 1/4 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (79)

Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger, 1975. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 40 x 40 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

(Video) Andy Warhol: Polaroids 1958-1987 - XL Version - Taschen - 2015 - book flip

For all the notorious hedonism of Warhol’s 1970s social scene, he had returned to painting with renewed vitality. The Factory’s “business art” provided a steady income, which freed him to experiment, starting with the subversive Mao series (1972–73). He made nearly 200 paintings of the Chinese Communist leader appropriated from a widely circulated official portrait, including several wall-size versions. Warhol embellished each image with garish colors and droll markings that undercut the political propaganda’s formality with a flamboyance befitting a celebrity, and also invoked the gestural forms of Abstract Expressionism. Warhol had distanced himself from abstraction early on, but as the ‘70s unfolded, he kept finding radical new ways to re-think it. He made his Piss and Oxidations (1977), for instance, by urinating on canvases coated with metallic-based paint which produced beautiful iridescent tones of green, gray, and copper. The abject process took aim at the sanctity of Jackson Pollock’s gestural splatters and drips — but it also signaled that Warhol was, as always, hyperaware of awareness of the era’s rising punk-rock tide.

In one of his most monumental and complex series, Shadows (1978–79), Warhol figured out how to present an image that was completely representational yet entirely abstract (something he’d do again in the ‘80s with his Camouflage and Rorschach paintings). The “subject” was a shadow that had been cast by an unidentified object in his studio, photographed and then silkscreened onto 102 canvases, each painted a vibrant hue and arranged edge to edge. The project had been commissioned by the adventurous dealer Heiner Friedrich (who later founded Lone Star/Dia Art Foundation), and proved, among other things, that Warhol didn’t need the power of popular imagery to mesmerize viewers.


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (80)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait with video camera, 1984. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (81)

Andy Warhol. Gale Smith, 1979. 40 x 40 inches. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (82)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait with Caroline Law (retouching her portrait), late-1970s. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (83)

Andy Warhol, Time Capsule 11. Mixed Archival Materials. ©The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (84)

Andy Warhol, Time Capsule 237 contents. Mixed archival materials. ©The Andy Warhol Museum.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (85)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait painting Shadow, 1978. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (86)

Andy Warhol, Shadows (1 of 102), 1978-79. Acrylic, variously silkscreened and painted on canvas. 75 x 52 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (87)

Andy Warhol, Untitled, 1979. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (88)

Andy Warhol, Oxidation Painting, 1978. Copper and urine on canvas, 75 1/4 x 51 1/2 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol continued expanding his artistic vision, as changing tastes and technology reshaped culture in the 1980s. He made music videos, created computer art, and produced experimental television shows that merged the fashion, entertainment, and art world (including Andy Warhol’s Fifteen Minutes, which aired on MTV). Open to the vibrant new forms emerging from the East Village art scene in the 1980s, Warhol teamed up with young painter Jean Michel-Basquiat (who would become a close friend) to collaborate on a series that combined his readymade iconography of logos with the rising star’s graffiti-style expressionism.

The year before his death, Warhol’s independent studio practice remained as prolific and zeitgeist-tapping as ever. In 1986, he painted more than 100 works related to Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper, which some have read as complex reckoning of his homosexuality, Catholicism, and mortality in response to witnessing AIDS devastate the gay community

Warhol died unexpectedly in February 1987 from complications following routine gallbladder surgery. He was just 58. Thousands attended his mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York. Death had long fascinated Warhol — even before his own near-death experience in 1968. We see it in his Marilyns and 13 Most Wanted, in his Skulls and Last Suppers. InThe Philosophy of Andy Warhol, he mused: “I don’t believe in it, because you’re not around to know that it’s happened. I can’t say anything about it because I’m not prepared for it.” But in a way, Warhol had prepared for it. In his will he called for the creation of a foundation dedicated to “the advancement of the visual arts.” In doing so, he ensured that future generations would keep pushing art in radical new directions — and that his death would be a starting point rather than an ending.


Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (89)

Andy Warhol, Self-portait, 1986. Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 80 x 80 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (90)

Andy Warhol, Tama Janowitz, 1986. Black and white print, 10 x 8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (91)

Andy Warhol, The Last Supper, 1986. Silkscreen ink on polymer paint on canvas, 40 x 40 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (92)

Andy Warhol, Peter Halley, 1986. Polacolor ER, 4 ¼ x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (93)

Andy Warhol, Grace Jones, 1986. Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 40 x 40 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (94)

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait in Drag, 1981. Polacolor 2, 4 ¼ x 3 3/8 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (95)

Andy Warhol, Self- portrait Working with Jean Michel Basquiat, 1984. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (96)

Andy Warhol, Martha Graham: Letter to the World (The Kick), 1986. Screen print on Lenox Museum Board, 36 x 36 inches. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol – The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (97)

Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, 1984. Photographic reproduction from 35mm negative. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

30 June 2020
Foundation 1 April 2020
16 January 2020
Multi-year Program Support New Venture Fund – Media Democracy Fund Washington, DC
(Video) Prince, Andy Warhol, and Fair Use at the Supreme Court

“We strive to support institutions that share our artist-centered values. The small grassroots arts organizations as well as the museums that comprise our grantees provide invaluable opportunities for artists to express their unique perspectives on the pressing urgencies of the day. We hope that our grants help to amplify artists’ voices within their communities, in national discussions and debates, and across platforms in the international contemporary art world.”

Joel Wachs, President

FAQs

What does the Andy Warhol Foundation do? ›

The Foundation is dedicated to supporting the creation of new work by experimental visual artists. Funding reaches artists through flexible grants awarded to the organizations and institutions that support them.

What does Andy Warhol's art represent? ›

Warhol went on to make artworks depicting Campbell's packaging throughout his career, exploring their simple graphic designs as symbols of ordinary American life. He often repeated images of soup cans in grid formations, transforming these everyday items into minimalist artworks.

What is the main style and characteristics of Andy Warhol? ›

Colorful: Warhol embraced bold and often garish colors. He used a high level of saturation and contrast to draw focus to particular features and make the iconic imagery stand out even more.

What is Andy Warhol's style of art? ›

Andy Warhol

What is Andy Warhol background? ›

The son of Ruthenian (Rusyn) immigrants from what is now eastern Slovakia, Warhol graduated in 1949 from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University), Pittsburgh, with a degree in pictorial design. He then went to New York City, where he worked as a commercial illustrator for about a decade.

What was Andy Warhol's cause of death? ›

This reticence produced fatal results on February 21, 1987, when Warhol died of cardiac arrest suffered after gallbladder surgery, a procedure that he had delayed for several years due to his fear of hospitals.

What does Pop Art represent? ›

Pop art is an art movement that emerged in the 1950s and flourished in the 1960s in America and Britain, drawing inspiration from sources in popular and commercial culture. Different cultures and countries contributed to the movement during the 1960s and 70s. Roy Lichtenstein. Whaam! (

How did Andy Warhol impact the world? ›

Andy Warhol wasn't just influential; he created a whole new genre of contemporary art – pop art. “During the 1960's, consumerism and commercialism in America had taken over the nation. Warhol reacted to the assault of advertisements and popular figures by illustrating these trends in his artwork.

What are some characteristics of Warhol's artwork? ›

Warhol's works typify many aspects of the movement, like an obsession with celebrity, the repetition of images, and the use of advertising as subject matter.

How does Pop art influence today? ›

Pop art continues to be an inexhaustible source of inspiration for fashion, design, the entertainment industry, advertising methods, popular culture in general, over and over again.

What influenced Andy Warhol in Pop Art? ›

Warhol took notice of new emerging artists, greatly admiring the work of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, which inspired him to expand his own artistic experimentation. In 1960, Warhol began using advertisements and comic strips in his paintings.

How did Andy Warhol create his art? ›

While Warhol didn't invent the photographic silkscreen process, he developed his own technique by combining hand-painted backgrounds with photographic silkscreen printed images to create unique works of art.

How do you draw Andy Warhol pop art? ›

How to Draw POP Art Easy - for Kids and Beginners like Andy Warhol ...

How do you explain pop art to a child? ›

Pop art is a style of art based on simple, bold images of everyday items, such as soup cans, painted in bright colors. Pop artists created pictures of consumer product labels and packaging, photos of celebrities, comic strips, and animals.

Why did Andy Warhol paint celebrities? ›

Capturing Celebrity

Warhol became fascinated by the very idea of figures such Monroe, with a glamorous lifestyle and an almost mythical status as a Hollywood icon, and wanted to portray her as a sex goddess and a consumer item to be mass produced. Warhol also enjoyed the carefree parties and lifestyle of rock stars.

Is Andy Warhol still alive? ›

How much was Andy Warhol worth? ›

And he was a brilliant businessman who left behind $100 million. The day Andy Warhol died, Paul and John Warhola flew to New York.

Who shot Andy Warhol Why? ›

The woman who shot Andy Warhol was Valerie Solanas, a subversive feminist with extreme, polemic views. A regular fixture in the New York social scene, Solanas wrote a series of radical texts that made many uncomfortable. Some were even too extreme for the Pop Art social circle around her. One of these was the S.C.U.M.

What makes Pop art interesting? ›

Pop Art Offers a Pop of Bright Colors

One of the things that make pop art unique and lively is that it has vivid, bright colors that lend cheerfulness, optimism, and a sunny vibe.

What I have learned about Pop art? ›

Pop Art is an art movement that began in the mid-1950s in the US and UK. Inspired by consumerist culture (including comic books, Hollywood films, and advertising), Pop artists used the look and style of mass, or 'Popular', culture to make their art.

What type of art is Pop art? ›

Pop art is an art movement that emerged in the United Kingdom and the United States during the mid- to late-1950s. The movement presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular and mass culture, such as advertising, comic books and mundane mass-produced objects.

Did Andy Warhol really paint? ›

Warhol used the same techniques—silkscreens, reproduced serially, and often painted with bright colors—whether he painted celebrities, everyday objects, or images of suicide, car crashes, and disasters, as in the 1962–63 Death and Disaster series.

Who created pop art? ›

The first definition of Pop Art was provided by British curator Lawrence Alloway, who invented the term 'Pop Art' in 1955 to describe a new form of art characterized by the imagery of consumerism, new media, and mass reproduction.

How many artworks did Andy Warhol make? ›

From the late 1940s until his death in 1987, Andy Warhol produced over 9,000 paintings and sculptures and nearly 12,000 drawings.

What is Andy Warhol's most famous piece? ›

Campbell's Soup Cans (1962)

Warhol often appropriated familiar images from consumer culture in his work, and his Campbell's Soup Cans painting is perhaps the most famous example of this. The original series was made up of 32 canvases, with each depicting a different variety of soup offered by the company at the time.

What is the most famous piece of pop art? ›

What Is the Most Famous Piece of Pop Art? One of, or perhaps the most recognizable pieces of Pop art is the famous Andy Warhol's Marilyn Diptych, which he created in 1962. The piece is painted on silkscreen and depicts 50 images of the famous actress Marilyn Munroe.

What was Andy Warhol's most famous painting called? ›

Marilyn Diptych, 1962: Warhol's Most Iconic Portrait

Warhol created many portraits of Marilyn, but his most famous is The Marilyn Diptych, 1962, now held in Tate gallery's collection in London.

Did Andy Warhol create his own art? ›

Warhol's grid-like paintings of dollar bills from 1962 are his earliest attempts at silk-screen printing, when the artist was still getting to know the process. At that time he used his own drawings as the basis to create the silk-screened print.

What techniques are used in Pop Art? ›

Common techniques included printing, silkscreening, collage, mixed media, and the use of Ben Day Dots. Pop Art Artists also favored bold colors, often used on images that were isolated from the background or taken out of context.

How does Pop Art make you feel? ›

Pop Art is cheerful. Usually pop art deals with bold colors, fun subjects and wild design. Rather then put you in state of depression, pop art is typically an uplift experience that might just bring a smile to your face.

How does art influence the world? ›

Art gives us meaning and helps us understand our world. Scientific studies have proven that art appreciation improves our quality of life and makes us feel good. When we create art, we elevate our mood, we improve our ability to problem solve, and open our minds to new ideas.

What makes Pop Art differ from of art? ›

Part of what makes Pop art unique is that it rejects the notion of uniqueness. Instead of trying to be unique, pop artists embraced mass-production and elements from popular culture. Artworks in the Pop art style often employ commercial techniques such as silk screening to produce multiple replicas of artwork.

What is the relationship between Andy Warhol's work and his audience? ›

Warhol is allowing people to look at his work of art and determine their own purpose and meaning for it. He sees the audience as everyday people in society. The repetition is ironic and continues in many more of Warhol's pieces.

What media does Warhol use to create his artwork? ›

Andy Warhol

How does Andy Warhol use Colour in his work? ›

The silk screen method is what most people today call screen printing. It allows you to print an image in many different colors which is most likely why Warhol picked to use this method for the majority of his art work. He would “print the background color and the shapes first, then the photographic image…..

How do you make Andy Warhol prints? ›

How to Print Like Warhol | Tate - YouTube

What happened to Jon Gould Andy Warhol? ›

In February 1984, Gould was diagnosed with AIDS. The news shook Warhol, who was already deeply afraid of all illnesses and contagions. By 1985, the relationship had crumbled, and Gould moved back to Los Angeles. He died a year later, aged just 33.

Did Andy Warhol have children? ›

Andy Warhol did not have children. Warhol was an openly gay man; his openness was notable in that during his lifetime homosexuality was significantly less accepted than in the 21st century.

Was Warhol a shot? ›

On June 3, 1968, Valerie Solanas, a troubled writer who had appeared in one of Warhol's films, shot Andy Warhol in the abdomen at his new studio at 33 Union Square West. She also shot art critic Mario Amaya, and Fred Hughes was in her sights when the elevator doors suddenly opened, and she ran out.

Who are the Pop Art artists? ›

Pop art

Who inherited Warhol's estate? ›

The only other bequests were $250,000 each to John and Paul Warhola -- and $250,000 to Frederick W. Hughes, Warhol's longtime front man and business manager and now the sole executor of his estate.

Is Andy Warhol's Jed still alive? ›

Initially hired by Andy Warhol to sweep floors at The Factory, he subsequently moved in with Warhol, and was his partner for twelve years.
...
Jed Johnson (designer)
Jed Johnson
DiedJuly 17, 1996 (aged 47) TWA Flight 800, East Moriches, New York, United States
OccupationFilm director, designer
2 more rows

Is Andy Warhol still alive? ›

How much is Andy Warhol art worth? ›

An original Warhol painting could cost anywhere from $600 to over $100 million, while prints are much cheaper than the originals they are based on. However, even the prices of Andy Warhol prints can vary, depending on the total number of similar prints in circulation.

How did Andy Warhol make money? ›

They were shooting movies under his name, selling his prints and finding him portrait commissions — one way or another, making money with art.

What did Andy Warhol suffer from? ›

The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. As a child, Warhol suffered from Sydenham chorea, a neurological disorder commonly known as St. Vitus dance, characterized by involuntary movements.

Why did Andy Warhol look like that? ›

Andy Warhol's skin began to lose pigment when he was about eight years old. He developed acne and rosacea, which made his skin appear red and blotchy in places. He was teased by other children, who called him Spot or Andy the Red-Nosed Warhola.

How did Andy Warhol get famous? ›

In 1962, he received notoriety in the art world when his paintings of Campbell's soup cans, Coca-Cola bottles, and wooden replicas of Brillo soap-pad boxes were exhibited in Los Angeles and New York.

Why is Pop Art important? ›

The Pop Art movement is important because it made art accessible to the masses, not just to the elite. As the style drew inspiration from commercial figures and cultural moments, the work was recognised and respected among the general public.

What style is Pop Art? ›

In the United States, pop style was a return to representational art (art that depicted the visual world in a recognisable way) and the use of hard edges and distinct forms after the painterly looseness of abstract expressionism.

Why is it called Pop Art? ›

In reference to its intended popular appeal and its engagement with popular culture, it was called Pop art. Pop artists strove for straightforwardness in their work, using bold swaths of primary colors, often straight from the can or tube of paint.

Videos

1. ANDY WARHOL 12" THE BUST VINYL ART SCULPTURE - GREEN CAMOUFLAUGE EDITION (LIMITED 200) UNBOXING!!!
(Fantasma House)
2. Andy Warhol's Marilyn Diptych: Great Art Explained
(Great Art Explained)
3. CAM Look | Mao Tse-Tung by Andy Warhol | 8/5/22
(cincinnatiartmuseum)
4. Andy Warhol's Blotted Line Technique (with audio description)
(The Andy Warhol Museum)
5. Marisol's Portrait of Andy Warhol
(The Andy Warhol Museum)
6. Goldsmith vs Warhol Foundation informational speech
(Sophie Scott)

Top Articles

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Velia Krajcik

Last Updated: 11/07/2022

Views: 5453

Rating: 4.3 / 5 (74 voted)

Reviews: 81% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Velia Krajcik

Birthday: 1996-07-27

Address: 520 Balistreri Mount, South Armand, OR 60528

Phone: +466880739437

Job: Future Retail Associate

Hobby: Polo, Scouting, Worldbuilding, Cosplaying, Photography, Rowing, Nordic skating

Introduction: My name is Velia Krajcik, I am a handsome, clean, lucky, gleaming, magnificent, proud, glorious person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.