Language Objectives: The Key to Effective Content Area Instruction for English Learners (2022)

Language Objectives: The Key to Effective Content Area Instruction for English Learners (1)

This article provides an overview of how to use language objectives in content-area instruction for English learners and offers classroom-based examples from different grade and subject levels.

This article written for Colorín Colorado provides an overview of how to use language objectives in content-area instruction for English learners and includes:

  • what a language objective is
  • steps that teachers can take to create language objectives
  • how to implement language objectives in a general education classroom
  • how to align objectives to content and language standards
  • ideas and resources on how to support teachers as they become familiar with this practice
  • how to use language objectives in distance learning environments.

Language Objectives: An Overview

Mrs. Shell has been teaching eighth grade math for twelve years. She has deep content area knowledge and wants to provide all of her students with authentic activities and tasks to relate the significance of the mathematical concepts that she teaches to their lives. Mrs. Shell has always felt successful at teaching her classes but this year has been different. Her sections include students with more diverse backgrounds than previous years, particularly more English learners.

As Mrs. Shell was beginning to feel frustrated with her inability to reach all her students because of their needs, she learned about one way to make her content more comprehensible to all her students — creating and posting objectives that tell the students not just what content concepts they will learn in each lesson, but also the academic language they will need to learn and use to meet the state's math standards. With this knowledge, Mrs. Shell is now confident that she not only knows what to teach, but also how to teach it so that all her students can be successful.

Academic English

Generally speaking, academic English is the language of schooling and the language that helps students acquire and use the content area knowledge taught in schools (Anstrom, DiCerbo, Butler, Katz, Millet, & Rivera, 2010).

Teaching content to ELs: The challenge

In my work supporting general education and ESL/bilingual teachers who provide sheltered instruction for English learners (ELs), I have met many teachers like Mrs. Shell. While these teachers want to provide effective instruction for their ELs, often they don't see themselves as language teachers and so they aren't sure where to begin with their students.

These teachers aren't alone, however, and they are facing a challenge shared by teachers across the country. We know that for school-age students, academic language is crucial for school success (Francis, Rivera, Lesaux, Kieffer, & Rivera, 2006). In addition, research allows us to state with a fair degree of confidence that English learners best acquire English when language forms are explicitly taught and when they have many opportunities to use the language in meaningful contexts (Goldenberg, 2008).

Yet while the explicit instructional support that ESL and bilingual teachers provide is essential to English learners' academic language development, English learners receive a majority of their instruction from general education and content area teachers who may not have experience teaching academic language development.

The question becomes then: What do general education classroom teachers need to do in order to support the academic English development of language learners in both face-to-face and virtual environments, especially when English learners are one of many types of students they serve?

Teaching content to ELs: The solution

One principle that teachers of English learners can begin to apply immediately is creating and posting language objectives for their lessons (whether in the classroom or online in a virtual space. Many teachers are familiar with using content objectives to identify what students will learn and be able to do in the lesson. However, they are less likely to include language objectives that support the linguistic development of their students.

Implementing language objectives can be a powerful first step in ensuring that English learners have equal access to the curriculum even though they may not be fully proficient in the language. This is because the second language acquisition process requires opportunities for the language learner to be exposed to, practice with, and then be assessed on their language skills (Echevarria, Short, & Vogt, 2008).

To this end, language objectives:

(Video) Writing Effective Language Objectives

  • articulate for learners the academic language functions and skills that they need to master to fully participate in the lesson and meet the grade-level content standards (Echevarria, Short, & Vogt, 2008).
  • are beneficial not only for language learners but for all students in a class, as everyone can benefit from the clarity that comes with a teacher outlining the requisite academic language to be learned and mastered in each lesson.

Now let's take a closer look at some examples and how to write language objectives.

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Writing Language Objectives

What is a language objective?

Language objectives are lesson objectives that specifically outline the type of language that students will need to learn and use in order to accomplish the goals of the lesson. Quality language objectives complement the content knowledge and skills identified in content area standards and address the aspects of academic language that will be developed or reinforced during the teaching of grade-level content concepts (Echevarria & Short, 2010).

These objectives involve the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing), but they can also include:

  • the language functions related to the topic of the lesson (e.g., justify, hypothesize)
  • vocabulary essential to a student being able to fully participate in the lesson (e.g., axis, locate, graph)
  • language learning strategies to aid in comprehension (e.g, questioning, making predictions).

Below are examples of language objectives for different content areas and grade levels. They come from the Common Core State Standards for Math and English Language Arts (2012) and state standards in New York and California.

3rd grade Science, States of Matter
Content Area StandardContent ObjectiveLanguage Objective
California: Students know that matter has three forms: solid, liquid, and gas.Students will be able to distinguish between liquids, solids, and gases and provide an example of each.Students will be able to orally describe characteristics of liquids, solids, and gases to a partner.
4th grade Math, Two-Dimensional Figures
Content Area StandardContent ObjectiveLanguage Objective
Common Core: Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles.Students will be able to classify triangles based on their angles.Students will be able to read descriptions of triangles and their angles.
7th Social Studies, Colonial Communities
Content Area StandardContent ObjectiveLanguage Objective
New York: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live.Students will be able show how geographic features have affected colonial life by creating a map.Students will be able to summarize in writing how geography impacted colonial life.
9th grade English Language Arts, Informative/Explanatory Texts
Content Area StandardContent ObjectiveLanguage Objective
Common Core: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.Students will be able to draft a conclusion paragraph for their expository essay.Students will be able to use transitional phrases (e.g., as a result) in writing.

Sources:

How do I create effective language objectives?

Video Bonus!

Language Objectives: The Key to Effective Content Area Instruction for English Learners (2) Dr. Cindy Lundgren discusses the process of writing language objectives in this excerpt from her Meet the Expert interview.

Language objectives are directly correlated to content objectives. Once a teacher determines the lesson topic from the appropriate content standards, the teacher will want to begin thinking about the academic language necessary for English learners to complete the tasks that support the content objectives. This identification of the academic language embedded in the lesson's content will become the basis for the lesson's language objectives.

You can use the following guidelines to start thinking about appropriate language objectives for the lesson:

  1. Decide what key vocabulary, concept words, and other academic words students will need to know in order to talk, read, and write about the topic of the lesson. Those words might be taught as a language objective. They should include technical terms, such as ecosystem, and terms like distribution that have different meanings across content areas. Other terms to highlight are those that language learners may know in one context, such as family (as in parents, siblings, etc.), but that have a different use in science (e.g., family of elements in the periodic table).
  2. Consider the language functions related to the topic of the lesson (e.g, will the students describe, explain, compare, or chart information). See your state English Language Proficiency (ELP) standards for examples of these functions for English language arts, math, science, and social studies for all English proficiency levels and grade-level clusters.
  3. Think about the language skills necessary for students to accomplish the lesson's activities. Will the students be reading a textbook passage to identify the stages of mitosis? Are they able to read a text passage to find specific information? Will they be reporting what they observe during a scientific demonstration to a peer? Do they know how to report observations orally? Acquiring the skills needed to carry out these tasks might be the focus of a language objective.
  4. Identify grammar or language structures common to the content area. For example, many science textbooks use the passive voice to describe processes. Additionally, students may have to use comparative language to analyze two related concepts. Writing with the passive voice or using comparative phrases might be a language objective.
  5. Consider the tasks that the students will complete and the language that will be embedded in those assignments. If students are working on a scientific investigation together, will they need to explain the steps of the procedure to one another? The language objective might focus on how to explain procedures aloud.
  6. Explore language learning strategies that lend themselves to the topic of the lesson. For example, if students are starting a new chapter in the textbook, the strategy of previewing the text might be an appropriate language objective.

(Adapted from Short, Himmel, Gutierrez, & Hudec, 2012. Used with permission.)

Aligning Language Objectives and Standards

English Language Proficiency (ELP) standards

Developing appropriate language objectives for lessons involves becoming familiar with a state's content area and ELP standards. Whereas the content standards will provide the topic of the lesson and what exactly the students should be doing with that topic (e.g., solving problems, creating models, ranking ideas), the English language proficiency or development standards help to identify language skills and functions that students should be working on to achieve academic language fluency. These ELP standards can help to identify:

  • communicative tasks (e.g., retelling, asking clarification questions)
  • language structures (e.g., sequential language, past-conditional tense)
  • types of texts students need to understand (e.g., informational text versus literature).

English Language Arts (ELA) standards

Other resources in addition to the ELP standards are a state's English Language Arts standards or the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History, Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (CCSS). The English Language Arts and Literacy CCSS might be especially useful to teachers of English learners due to its attention to literacy across the content areas.

Additional resources to consult, especially if a state is a member of the WIDA consortium, are the Model Proficiency Indicators (MPIs) outlined in their ELP standards. The MPIs outline what an English learner at a specific level of English language proficiency can do in a language domain (e.g., listening) by addressing the language functions embedded in an example topic for that content area with appropriate scaffolds or support (Gottlieb, Cranley, & Cammileri, 2007). Classroom texts and other materials (e.g., science investigations, primary source documents) are other good sources to consult when preparing a lesson.

Getting Started

How can I get started?

(Video) Creating Language Objectives with English Learner Portal

Planning template

The Content and Language Objectives planning template used in SIOP Model workshops offered by CAL helps teachers begin to practice writing their own objectives.

Careful lesson planning

In creating measureable and student-friendly language objectives that support the content objectives, it is important that learner tasks in the lesson are aligned with the objectives. It is not enough to have well-written objectives that promote language acquisition if the lesson is lacking in tasks that support the objectives. If the language objective for a middle school social studies lesson is for the students to orally retell the key characteristics in a historical event using sequential language, it is important that the teacher previews sequential language with the students, such as providing sentence stems or frames, and builds into the lesson some structured pair work so the students have an opportunity to retell the event to a peer. Therefore, careful lesson planning is another essential step in preparing effective language objectives.

Collaboration

It is also useful for content area and ESL/bilingual teachers to plan lessons together, as we saw with the 7th grade science lesson scenario involving Mr. Zhang and Mr. Lewis. In this co-planning scenario, each teacher used his expertise to better integrate content and language instruction for the language learners. This type of collaboration can help a teacher like Mr. Zhang learn more about the second language acquisition process of his students and can help a teacher like Mr. Lewis become more familiar with the grade-level content expectations that his English learners encounter in content area classes.

How do I know which language objectives are best for my students?

The language objective that the teacher selects will depend on what the English learners in the class need most at that point in the year and what language is most important to understanding the content concepts. If the students have already spent a good deal of time working with new vocabulary, then the teacher might consider having students use that vocabulary to develop their writing skill by writing a summary of the process they followed.

Conversely, the teacher might want to help students become more proficient with a particular type of graphic organizer in order to develop more strategic language learning. As all teachers know, teaching is a dynamic and complex process that requires a multitude of decisions to be made. However, the advance planning required in creating language objectives allows teachers to better anticipate the academic English needs of all students thus increasing the comprehensibility of the lessons.

It is important for teachers to realize that even though their lesson may include all four language skills (it is good if they do, since the language skills reinforce one another), they do not need to post a language objective for every language-related item addressed in the lesson. Teachers address many instructional needs in a 50- or 60-minute class period. Rather than highlighting all language uses in a particular lesson, it is important for the teacher to think about what is non-negotiable in that lesson.

In other words, the teacher should keep the perspective of the English learner in mind and ask, "Of all of the skills and functions addressed in my lesson, which is most important for helping students meet the grade-level standard and develop their language proficiency?" These objectives then must be measureable (i.e., can you see or assess the student's mastery of that objective?) and written in language that accounts for the linguistic and cognitive development of the students.

How can I make language objectives "student-friendly"?

Both of the above objectives are measurable, but both also take into account appropriate developmental stages of the students. Teachers of young students (e.g., PK or K) may even want to consider further adapting the objectives. For example, we have seen kindergarten teachers use symbols such as a pencil to symbolize "write" and a mouth to symbolize "talk" when they post their objectives for the children to see. We have also seen teachers of young learners rely on pictures to show the key terms they want the students to use or to convey the topic of the lesson (e.g., a picture of a ruler and of hands to discuss standard and non-standard measurement).

One way that teachers can ensure that their language objectives are measureable and student-friendly is by using appropriate verbs. Because language objectives should provide students with practice in the four language skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, verbs related to those skills might include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • List
  • Retell
  • Summarize in writing
  • Record
  • Read

It is also important to not equate low language proficiency with limited cognitive ability. Therefore, teachers will want to make sure that the language objectives they create also reflect tasks that fall on the higher end of Bloom's Taxonomy and use verbs (e.g., orally justify) accordingly.

As noted above in the guidelines to creating language objectives, language functions are also a potential source for language objectives. Verbs related to language functions might include:

  • Describe
  • Orally explain
  • Report findings in writing

When should I share language objectives with students?

To help students take ownership of their learning and provide explicit direction to students, especially the English learners who are processing content in a new language, it is important that objectives be stated at the beginning of the lesson and reviewed with the students at the end of the lesson to allow them to assess if they have met the objectives (Echevarria, Vogt & Short, 2008).

How this happens may differ according to the grade level and content area of the class. Some teachers like to have the students choral read the objectives, while teachers of older students sometimes have them record the language objectives in their journal in addition to asking an individual student to read them aloud. Some teachers, such as those who teach science, like to reveal the objectives later in the lesson, perhaps after the warm up or exploratory activity, so that they can maintain an inquiry-based approach (Echevarria & Colburn, 2006).

Should I differentiate language objectives based on my students' language proficiency?

Although all teachers have students of varying language proficiency and skill levels in their classes, it is not necessary to differentiate language objectives by creating and posting multiple language objectives that reflect these proficiency levels. Rather, teachers should have one language objective that is appropriate for all students to meet. To provide the appropriate differentiation, the teacher would provide different scaffolds (e.g., adapted text, visuals, sentence frames) for students to use in order to reach the objectives.

For example, an appropriate language objective for an upper elementary language arts class might be for the students to be able to orally list text features found in a non-fiction book. For lower proficiency language learners, the teacher may give them a word bank from which to choose the text features; therefore, the students are meeting the same objective but with the appropriate amount of linguistic support from the teacher.

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Using language objectives in a distance learning environment

While teachers like Ms. Shell understand that the characteristics of good teaching for English learners does not change in a virtual environment, they do understand that instruction will necessarily need to look different in order to account for the challenges that distance learning presents for many learners.

Accordingly, teachers will need to think through how to:

  • present language objectives to learners in engaging ways
  • measure learner understanding of the objective throughout the delivery of the lesson
  • assess student mastery towards those objectives.

Presenting language objectives

Many different ways exist for teachers to present language objectives in remote learning. For example, teachers might:

(Video) Language Objectives in 4 Easy Steps

  • begin every virtual class by orally reading and presenting the content and language objectives in their Google slides and then asking students to briefly summarize in the chat box the activities they will be doing in that lesson to meet those objectives.
  • post the objectives at the top of a shared digital document that serves as a capture sheet for the lesson. A teacher might then ask learners to self-assess their progress towards meeting those objectives at the end of the document.
  • use live or recorded videos, especially when working with English learners with lower English proficiency. These videos can include props, for example ears to signify a listening objective.
  • use realia, such as rocks, if one of the lesson's language aims is for students to orally describe different types of sedimentary rocks.

Monitoring student understanding and engagement

Teachers in distance learning environments must also carefully consider how they will assess learner understanding and engagement throughout the lesson. Given the challenges virtual learning platforms present towards capturing data on learner comprehension (e.g., paralinguistic cues such as facial expressions, gestures, posture) teachers working in virtual environments know that it is more important than ever to ensure that students clearly understand the content and linguistic aims for each lesson.

Using comprehension checks and assessing progress

It is also essential that students understand how teachers will measure their progress towards meeting each objective. Towards this aim, teachers must build in multiple comprehension checks throughout the lesson that align to the lesson's objectives. Teachers can:

  • use apps such as Kahoot to create quick and simple comprehension checks throughout a lesson
  • incorporate turn and talks via breakout rooms at preset intervals throughout a lesson that provide the teacher an opportunity to determine if students are practicing the academic language highlighted in the language objective
  • visit the breakout rooms and use a simple oral language checklist to measure student progress towards linguistic aims of lessons, or teachers can capture that information via the use of shared digital documents where students synthesize in writing their oral discussion.

At the conclusion of a lesson, teachers can assess student progress towards meeting objectives via:

  • tickets out that are submitted digitally
  • the recording of a Flipgrid or use of another video platform where learners respond to a prompt that requires learners to use the academic language highlighted in the lesson's objectives.

Teachers can respond to the submitted tickets out or video with feedback that explicitly targets the students use of the language. When appropriate, teacher can provide learners with additional resources and/or support towards mastering that particular language skill or function. Teachers might also use that linguistic data to inform mini-lessons conducted to small groups of English learners during office hours or intervention time.

Next Steps

How can I learn more?

SIOP Model

For more information on the SIOP Model, see Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Model (Echevarria, Short, & Vogt, 2008).

Although language objectives can be implemented in any lesson design approach, they are especially congruent with sheltered instruction and the SIOP Model. Since language objectives ensure that teachers meet the unique linguistic needs of English learners, they are sometimes easier to implement in the context of instructional practices espoused by the SIOP Model.

Practices that focus on explicit academic language teaching include:

  • development of key vocabulary
  • peer-to-peer interaction
  • meaningful activities that allow learners to practice the academic language in authentic contexts.

Below are other resources that can help you learn more about creating language objectives and about integrating academic language into content area classes.

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Final Thoughts

We realize that it takes teachers some time to become very comfortable with creating language objectives, but our experience has shown that the implementation of language objectives can bring immediate benefits to instruction. Some immediate benefits include teachers understanding more concretely that they are both a content area and language teacher — as one teacher said in a CAL SIOP Model workshop, "I now see myself as a math teacher AND a language teacher".

We have also observed that when teachers consciously plan to meet the academic English needs of their learners, they end up with better planned learner tasks, and students begin to have more ownership of their content area and language learning. When it comes to building proficiency in academic English, as many teachers in our workshops remind us, "If you want to see it, you have to teach it." Therefore, if teachers want to see language development, language objectives are a great first step in helping teachers explicitly teach it.

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Recommended Resources

Further reading

Short, D., Himmel, J., Gutierrez, S., & Hudec, J. (2012). Using the SIOP Model: Professional development for sheltered instruction. Washington, DC: Center for Applied Linguistics.

Echevarria, J., Vogt, M.E., & Short, D. (2010). The SIOP Model for teaching mathematics to English learners. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Echevarria, J., & Short, D. (2011). The SIOP Model: A professional development framework for a comprehensive school-wide intervention. Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of English Language Learners (CREATE) Brief. http://www.cal.org/create/resources/pubs/professional-development-framework.html

Himmel, J., Short, D., Richards, C., & Echevarria, J. (2009). Using the SIOP Model to improve middle school science instruction. Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of English Language Learners (CREATE) Brief. http://www.cal.org/create/resources/pubs/siopscience.html

(Video) Lesson Development for English Learners in Content Area Settings: Key Considerations

Short, D., Vogt, M., & Echevarria, J. (2010a). The SIOP Model for teaching history-social studies to English learners. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

Short, D., Vogt, M., & Echevarria, J. (2010b). The SIOP Model for teaching science to English learners. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

Vogt, M.E., Echevarria, J., & Short, D. (2010). The SIOP Model for teaching English language arts to English learners. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

About the Author

Jennifer Himmel is the Project Director for the National Center for English Language Acquisition at the Manhattan Strategy Group. She previously served as the SIOP Manager at the Center for Applied Linguistics, a non-profit organization for language education research, policy, and practice in Washington, DC. She has served as a curriculum developer and research associate for the U.S. Department of Education funded project, Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of English Language Learners (CREATE) that is investigating academic achievement of ELLs in grades 4th-8th, and as a language testing specialist for the WIDA ACCESS for ELLs® language proficiency test. She currently manages the SIOP Model professional development service line and provides technical assistance and professional development in sheltered instruction to districts and schools.

Video Clip: Language Objectives

In this excerpt from her Meet the Expert interview, Dr. Cynthia Lundgren explains the value of writing language objectives when teaching English learners.

References

Anstrom, K., DiCerbo, P., Butler, F., Katz, A., Millet, J., & Rivera, C. (2010). A review of the literature on academic English: Implications for K-12 English language learners. Arlington, VA: The George Washington University Center for Equity and Excellence. Education.www.ceee.gwu.edu.

Echevarria, J., & Colburn, A. (2006). Designing lessons: Inquiry approach to science using the SIOP Model. In A. Lathman & D. Crowther (Eds.), Science for English language learners (pp.95-108). Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association Press.

Echevarria, J., Vogt, M., & Short, D. (2008). Making content comprehensible for English learners: The SIOP Model. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

Echevarria, J., & Short, D. ( 2010). Programs and practices for effective sheltered content instruction. In California Department of Education (Ed), Improving education for English learners: Research-based approaches. Sacramento, CA: CDE Press.

Francis, D., Rivera, M., Lesaux, N., Kieffer, M., & Rivera, H. (2006). Practical guidelines for the education of English language learners: Research-based recommendations for instruction and academic interventions. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. www.centeroninstruction.org/files/ELL1-Interventions.pdf

Goldenberg, C. (2008). Teaching English language learners: What the research does-and does not-say. American Educator, Summer 2008, pp. 13-44.

Gottlieb, M., Cranley, E., & Cammilleri, A. (2007). Understanding the WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards: A resource guide. Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, on behalf of the WIDA Consortium.

Short, D., Himmel, J., Gutierrez, S., & Hudec, J. (2012). Using the SIOP Model: Professional development for sheltered instruction. Washington, DC: Center for Applied Linguistics.

World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (2007). WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards. Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, on behalf of the WIDA Consortium http://www.wida.us/standards/elp.asp

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FAQs

Why are language objectives important for English learners? ›

Since language objectives ensure that teachers meet the unique linguistic needs of English learners, they are sometimes easier to implement in the context of instructional practices espoused by the SIOP Model. Practices that focus on explicit academic language teaching include: development of key vocabulary.

What are content and language objectives? ›

Content Objectives or Learning Targets represent what English learner students are learning in relation to state standards. (Analogy: It's the meat of the lesson.) Language Objectives or Success Criteria represent how English Learner students demonstrate mastery/understanding of the concept.

What are language objectives examples? ›

Reading skills such as main idea/detail, paraphrasing, monitoring/clarifying, and comprehension skill instruction can be emphasized. Writing skills such as paragraph writing and sentence structure might be another example of a language objective.

How does content objectives and language objectives drive instruction? ›

The content objective is related to the key concept of the lesson. The language objective promotes student academic language growth (it is not something most students already do well). The language objective connects clearly with the lesson topic or lesson activities.

What is the main objective of language learning? ›

An overarching aim of teaching and learning languages is to enable the student to become a critical and competent communicator. The aims of the teaching and learning of MYP language acquisition are to: gain proficiency in an additional language while supporting maintenance of their mother tongue and cultural heritage.

Why is it important to use objective language? ›

Objective language helps you learn the facts so you can draw your own conclusions and form your own opinion on a subject. Subjective language is used to influence how you feel or to persuade you to take action or agree with the writer.

Why is it important to teach language through content? ›

Integrated language and content instruction provides opportunities for learners to acquire a new language through the study of academic disciplines such as mathematics, science, and history.

How do you write language objectives? ›

To keep your writing objective, try to follow these tips:
  1. Be specific instead of vague or general. ...
  2. Do not use opinionated, prejudiced, or exclusive language. ...
  3. Avoid using first person to keep it more professional and less about you. ...
  4. Try not to over exaggerate your writing.
22 Aug 2021

What is content in learning objectives? ›

Content Objectives identify what students should know and be able to do at the end of the lesson. These objectives will frequently be used to form assessments. They are derived from the core standards. They focus on the “What.”

What is objective language in a sentence? ›

Objective language is a way of talking about things in a way that does not express opinion, feelings, personal biases etc. Being objective means talking in a way that is measurable, quantifiable and is based on data and scientific fact. It also means not exaggerating or distorting the data.

What are the four types of language objectives? ›

Writing Language Objectives: 4 Categories to Consider
  • learn, express, practice and apply new information.
  • demonstrate knowledge.
  • perform academic tasks.
3 May 2017

What are objectives give five examples? ›

6 Examples of Objectives
  • Education. Passing an exam is an objective that is necessary to achieve the goal of graduating from a university with a degree.
  • Career. Gaining public speaking experience is an objective on the path to becoming a senior manager.
  • Small Business. ...
  • Sales. ...
  • Customer Service. ...
  • Banking.
10 Jan 2017

How do you get students involved in learning content and language objectives? ›

Six Strategies for Teaching ELLs Across the Content Areas
  1. Determine content and language objectives for each lesson. ...
  2. Connect content to ELLs' background knowledge. ...
  3. Provide comprehensible input for ELLs. ...
  4. Make lessons auditory, visual, and kinesthetic. ...
  5. Use cooperative learning strategies.
5 Jun 2014

What are the goals of teachers who use content-based instruction? ›

The goal of CBI is to prepare students to acquire the language while using the context of any subject matter so that students learn the language by using it within that specific context. Rather than learning a language out of context, it is learned within the context of a specific academic subject.

Why is it important for all content area teachers to plan together? ›

Why is it important for all content area teachers to plan together? By planning content areas together, students develop the big idea behind the concepts from different subject areas.

What are the objectives of learning skills? ›

Learning objectives should be brief, clear, specific statements of what learners will be able to do at the end of a lesson as a result of the activities, teaching and learning that has taken place. They are sometimes called learning outcomes.

What do you mean by objective? ›

1a : something toward which effort is directed : an aim, goal, or end of action. b : a strategic position to be attained or a purpose to be achieved by a military operation. 2 : a lens or system of lenses that forms an image of an object.

How are content and language objectives important for both teachers and students? ›

Effective teachers use both content and language objectives on a daily basis to give students a well-rounded understanding of curriculum areas. Content and language objectives should be stated at the beginning of each lesson so that the students understand where they are going and what is expected of them.

What is an example of content based instruction? ›

Example: Students are learning about food nutrition. For a class activity, they will make a meal to enjoy together. They use English to discuss kitchen supplies needed as well as cooking methods to prepare their meal.

What is the content of teaching English? ›

Content – Progression in knowledge, skills and understanding related to specific elements of a defined curriculum. Communication – Using language to learn whilst learning to use language. Cognition – Developing thinking skills which link concept formation (abstract and concrete), understanding and language.

What is the best language objectively? ›

English came out on top, but not by much. Most of languages grouped pretty closely together, however, Japanese lagged behind the rest. Interestingly, the languages that conveyed the least amount of information per syllable, like Spanish, Japanese, and French, tended to be spoken at a faster rate.

What is the importance of objective content and learning resource in a lesson plan? ›

Learning objectives should be used to guide students as they work through the course, and to assess their learning progress. Excellent learning objectives provide a guide for students when reviewing materials and preparing for assessments. Learning objectives are the most powerful if they are actionable and measurable.

Why are learning objectives important for students? ›

When displayed to students, learning objectives set student expectations, guide their learning processes, and help them focus their study time for the upcoming exam(s).

What are student learning objectives examples? ›

Here is an example of how learning goals and learning outcomes relate to each other: Learning goal: “I want students to understand/learn/know the scientific method.” Learning objective: “Students will be able to describe the scientific methods and provide examples of its application.”

What are the 3 types of objectives? ›

Within the organization there are three levels of objectives: strategic goals, tactical objectives, and operational objectives.

What are the 4 areas of language? ›

Four Areas of Language
  • Language by mouth = speaking.
  • Language by ear = listening.
  • Language by eye = reading.
  • Language by hand = writing.
10 Apr 2019

Can you give me an example of objective? ›

Objective means someone or something that is without bias. An example of objective is a juror who doesn't know anything about the case they're assigned to.

What are the 4 main things that objectives should specify? ›

Instructional objectives contain four components: the Audience, the Behavior, the Condition, and the Degree.

What are good goals and objectives examples? ›

Overall Goal: I want to lose weight and be in better health. S.M.A.R.T. Goal: I will focus on my food habits, and I will begin to lead a healthier lifestyle. Specific: I will cut down on junk food as a first step toward overall good health.

How would you get students involved in learning the lesson content? ›

Teaching strategies to ensure student engagement
  1. Begin the lesson with an interesting fact. ...
  2. Exude enthusiasm and engagement. ...
  3. Encourage connections that are meaningful and relevant. ...
  4. Plan for short attention spans. ...
  5. Address different learning styles and multiple intelligences. ...
  6. Turn lessons into games. ...
  7. Turn lessons into stories.
11 Jul 2019

How can you support English language learners in the classroom? ›

How can I support ELLs in my classroom?
  1. Provide a welcoming classroom environment. ...
  2. Know and include the student. ...
  3. Modify your speech. ...
  4. Provide opportunities for interaction. ...
  5. Support literacy development. ...
  6. Reading Instruction. ...
  7. Development of Writing Skills. ...
  8. Support ELLS in the content areas: Math, Social Studies, Science.

How can you promote learners good understanding content? ›

Give learners clear lesson aims and refer to them at each stage
  1. keep track of the lesson stages.
  2. clearly see the connection between what they are doing in class and what they are supposed to learn.
  3. know exactly what is expected of them, reducing anxiety.
  4. self-monitor their progress.
30 Oct 2017

How can content based instruction be used in the language classroom? ›

Content-Based Instruction is an approach to language teaching that focuses not on the language itself, but rather on what is being taught through the language; that is, the language becomes the medium through which something new is learned.

What is content based instruction in language teaching? ›

Content-Based Instruction (CBI) refers to an approach to second language teaching in which teaching is organized around the content or information that students will acquire, rather than around a linguistic or other type of syllabus.

What are the basic principles of content based instruction? ›

According to Richards and Rodgers (2001), CBI is based on two relevant principles: (1) People learn a second language more successfully when they use the language as a means of acquiring infor- mation, rather than as an end in itself. (2) CBI better reflects learners' needs for learning a second language.

What is importance of content area? ›

Content area reading is important because it allows students to intentionally utilize and hone literacy skills throughout the school day, rather than just during language or literature focused class time.

Why is it important for teachers to consider objectives in planning instructions? ›

Educational goals and objectives provide a sense of mission and purpose. The more aware you are of your mission and purpose in teaching an area of content, the more you will be able to inspire your students to learn it.

What is the function of content in learner centered teaching? ›

Key Change 3: The Function of Content

Make the connection clear: Connect material and skills learned to application and ways of utilization either to the students' program of study, or some other higher goal. Make the connection between theory and practice.

What are content and language supports in the classroom? ›

Content Support: Bullet or separate steps in a process (e.g. multi-step problem, sequence of events). Language Support: Define or clarify construct-irrelevant words, phrases, and sentences using plain language, synonyms, definitions, examples, and consistent language.

How are content and language objectives important for both teachers and students? ›

Effective teachers use both content and language objectives on a daily basis to give students a well-rounded understanding of curriculum areas. Content and language objectives should be stated at the beginning of each lesson so that the students understand where they are going and what is expected of them.

What is meant by language content? ›

Language Content. Content is simply defined as the meaning of information. Language contains words to describe virtually everything that we know about our world. These words describe objects, actions, events, and concepts.

What is the difference between content and language objectives quizlet? ›

Content objectives are the what- what students need to learn about English in order to express new information and perform academic tasks. Language Objectives should include an observable language verb, a connection to the content objective , and an interaction with someone or something.

What is an example of content-based instruction? ›

Example: Students are learning about food nutrition. For a class activity, they will make a meal to enjoy together. They use English to discuss kitchen supplies needed as well as cooking methods to prepare their meal.

What is the role of the teacher in content-based instruction? ›

Teachers in content-based programs may be content specialists who use the target language for instruction, or language specialists who are using content for language instruction. To be effective in their roles, they will need the knowledge, skills and concepts required for content delivery in a second/foreign language.

How can content-based instruction be used in the classroom? ›

The content-based instruction (CBI) method teaches students a new language by delving into literature, history, and other topics within the language in question. The purpose is to generate interest in the student and help them learn the language through use-orientating lessons.

What is the importance of language learning materials both in learning and teaching? ›

Learning materials are important because they can significantly increase student achievement by supporting student learning. For example, a worksheet may provide a student with important opportunities to practice a new skill gained in class.

What are the benefits to learners of integrating content and language? ›

Benefits of CLIL

ü A natural way of learning a language and a real way of approaching a content/subject. ü It enhances students' motivation to learn what is being taught in the classroom. ü It enables students to learn more quickly and easily to improve overall and specific language competence.

Why is it important for all content area teachers to plan together? ›

Why is it important for all content area teachers to plan together? By planning content areas together, students develop the big idea behind the concepts from different subject areas.

What is the content of teaching English? ›

Content – Progression in knowledge, skills and understanding related to specific elements of a defined curriculum. Communication – Using language to learn whilst learning to use language. Cognition – Developing thinking skills which link concept formation (abstract and concrete), understanding and language.

What is the relationship between language and content? ›

Lesson Summary

Content talk is related more to the idea behind what is being said. In an English classroom, this might be the setting or time period of Huckleberry Finn. Language talk, on the other hand, is more concerned with what words are being used, or how something is being said.

What is content and example? ›

Content is defined as what is inside or included in something. An example of content is beans inside of a jar. An example of content is the words inside a book.

Is the content objective meaning? ›

What is a Content Objective? ›A Content Objective identifies what students should know and be able to do at the end of the lesson and leads to assessment. It is linked to engaging activities and to the learning outcomes.

What is the meaning of content and language integrated learning? ›

Definition of CLIL. CLIL: Content and Language Integrated Learning. 'CLIL is an approach in which a foreign language is used as a tool in the learning of a non-language subject in which both. language and the subject have a joint role.' (

What is the difference between content objectives and learning outcomes? ›

A learning outcome describes the overall purpose or goal from participation in an educational activity. Courses should be planned with a measurable learning outcome in mind. Objectives are used to organize specific topics or individual learning activities to achieve the overall learning outcome.

Videos

1. ESL Strategies: Instructional Supports (Scaffolds) for English Language Learners
(Adam Weiss)
2. Principles of Material+Media Development in English Language Teaching. #englishlanguageteaching
(Haryo Prawiro)
3. How to Lesson Plan to Differentiate for ELLs
(Inspiring Young Learners Beth Vaucher)
4. Guides for Supporting English Learners and the Five Key Themes in the ELA/ELD Framework
(RSDSS Region 3)
5. ELL Teacher. Content-Area Teacher Tips. Part 2. Samples, examples, tips...
(Alyona's Class Live)
6. Scaffolding Grade-Level Content for English learners
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