An introduction to the visual arts in early childhood education - THE EDUCATION HUB (2022)

The visual arts encompass an extensive range of visual modes that children utilise for expressing, communicating, mediating their thinking, engaging in aesthetic exploration and research. What is defined as visual arts is shaped by cultural and social values. Some common examples include painting, clay work, sculpture, collage, weaving, construction, photography, wearable art, carving, printing and ephemera, although there are many more modes of visual expression and exploration.

How do the visual arts support children’s learning?

Thinkingof the visual arts in early childhood education can initially evoke an image ofa child standing at an easel, thick stubby paintbrush in hand with brightacrylic poster paint spreading quickly across the page. However, research has shown the visual arts to be a richdomain through which young children can explore and represent theirexperiences, think through and deepen their workingtheories,and develop their creative thinking. It is through the visual arts thatchildren learn about the symbolic systems of representation and communicationvalued by their communities. The visual arts support children’s learning in anumber of ways:

  • Facilitating communication

For pre-literate children,the visual arts are a primary means through which they can explore and sharetheir perceptions of their world. The visual arts can help children tocommunicate ideas that cannot be expressed verbally ,which is particularlyimportant for children with English as a second language. The meanings ofchildren’s art works are not always obvious but, in some cases, the act ofcreating art can encourage children to talk as they work. When this occurs,both the artwork and the dialogue that occurs alongside are equally importantin helping teachers to better understand the child’s thinking[i].

The visual arts also supportchildren to communicate with each other, particularly when teachers createopportunities for them to work on shared projects or to explore commoninterests together. Such opportunitiesencourage children to exchange ideas, consider solutions and develop sharedmeanings through collaboration. Theseexperiences may also encourage childrento develop their verbal language[ii].

  • Mediating thinking

Researchers have built uponVygotsky’s theory that language acts as a tool to mediate thinking to suggestthat visual arts could work in a similar way and found that children’s visualrepresentations are more closely connected to thought than verbal language is[iii].When children create visual arts in groups, the act of representing thinkingvisually allows them to share their ideas with others. This supports them to transformtheir understandings through co-construction. In such an environment, childrencan try out new ideas as well as strategies for working with visual media,inspired by their peers, which they internalise and then draw upon later indifferent contexts. In this way, the visual arts support children to developtheir metacognitive capacities.

  • Developing an appreciation for diverse points of view

A wonderful aspect of the visualarts is that there is never one right answer. The visual arts offer multiple solutionsto a problem or ways that an idea can be expressed. When children haveopportunities to view each other creating visual arts, and to talk about theideas they are exploring through their art, they can develop an appreciationfor different perspectives and an understanding that knowledge is subjective,that there is no one ‘truth’ or correct answer.

  • Developingcultural knowledge and fostering identity formation

Researchers also assert that the visual arts,alongside other arts domains, are a primary means through which culturalidentity and associated values are shared with young children[iv], and argue that it isimportant that teachers develop understanding of how the visual arts are valuedby families and communities as a basis for creating culturally responsivevisual arts curriculum[v]. For children,experiencing the visual arts valued by their cultures within their earlychildhood settings can transmit powerful messages about how they and theirfamilies are valued. It is also vital that children are exposed to manydifferent examples of the visual arts so that they can develop an appreciationof a range of culturally diverse art forms within their early years. This canbe achieved by connecting with local community organisations such as galleries,artist studios and important cultural sites like the local marae.

  • Promoting creativity and imagination

The visual arts allow children to enter imaginativeworlds, to be creative and to engage in playful thinking. Developing children’simaginations is important for learning to show empathy for others. Creativity isthe capacity to develop unique ideas and solutions that are of value. Thevisual arts invite experimentation and exploration, and as such, support thedevelopment of creativity and what has been describedas ‘possibility thinking’[vi]. Fostering possibilitythinking develops key dispositions of learning such as problem solving,perseverance, collaboration and seeking support from others[vii].

  • Exploring aesthetics and the language of art

For some children, visualarts are a means to explore colour, texture and the possibilities of visualmedia. These children relish opportunities to develop skills and techniques. Research has highlighted how important it is thatchildren have opportunities to conceptualise their own art making in additionto opportunities to create in group contexts[viii].This allows them the space to immerse themselves in aesthetic explorationshould they wish.

(Video) Visual Arts in ECE short course

  • Developing critical literacy

Teaching children to interpret or ‘read’ visualmodes of communication is becoming increasingly important in the 21stcentury as children are constantly exposed to visual texts and multimodal texts[ix]. Multimodal texts arethose that include two or more ways of conveying messages, such as combining textand image. Some researchers argue that it is crucial that teachers talk withchildren about the images they encounter in their everyday environment,discussing how meanings have been conveyed by the artist or illustrator[x]. This helps children tounderstand that images, like stories, are constructed and that they communicatemessages. This is the first step in developing the ability to criticallyanalyse visual texts, a vital skill in a world saturated by images. Talkingwith children about images also allows them to understand that they too, havethe capacity to create images, to communicate ideas to others, or to exploreideas for themselves.

  • Offering emotional support

For some children, artmaking is their primary means ofprocessing their experiences. For these children, engagement in visual arts canimpact their emotional wellbeing, allowing them transition into the day, orinto a new centre environment. Research has also found that art making has the potential to significantlyreduce stress levels[xi]:it is important for children to have access to tools for art making throughoutthe day and particularly in the morning as a means to support these children tosettle into the day.

Why is the teacher’s role so important insupporting and facilitating visual arts experiences?

Teachersplay pivotal roles in how children experience the visual arts in earlychildhood. This is because it is teachers who create the classroom environment,who decide what visual arts materials are available and when, and who choose whereand when children will engage in the visual arts. Currently, teachers’practices in the visual arts vary greatly. In New Zealand, teachers often havewidely different views about how visual arts should be taught in the earlyyears. This can make it hard to understand what is appropriate and when.

Someteachers believe in a hands-off approach. Teachers who advocate for thisapproach can be informed by the belief that the child is innately creative. Theybelieve their role is to provide the materials and a supportive environment butthat the children can do it themselves. They perceive adult interference tonegatively impact the child’s creativity. Critique of this approach argues thatsociocultural theories have helped us to understand that children are in fact influencedby everything, their relationships, their environment, their culture and thematerials with which they interact. These theories highlight that learning is asocial experience: therefore, to create in isolation without feedback,discussion and interaction hinders artist development[xii]. In fact, children craveinteraction, feedback and discussion about their ideas, creations andinterests.

Incontrast, a teacher-directed approach is becoming increasingly adopted by someearly childhood teachers[xiii]. In these cases,teachers plan prefabricated activities for children that are often inspired bywebsites such as Pinterest. This is the kind of artwork where it can bedifficult to differentiate one child’s work from another. Such activities canfeel ‘safe’ for teachers because there are no surprises and they can controlthe outcome. However, too many teacher-directed experiences can negativelyimpact children’s self-efficacy in the arts and they can become reliant on theteacher for guidance and instruction[xiv].

Alack of personal confidence in visual arts may be one factor that promptsteachers to adopt a teacher-directed approach. Research has shown that a lackof self-efficacy in the arts often begins within one’s own schoolingexperiences[xv].Many teachers, when prompted, can trace back to the moment in their lives whena teacher or important role model criticised, over-directed or controlled theirartmaking[xvi].The result of such negative experiences can mean that teachers can avoid anyfurther learning in the visual arts and can experience anxiety when thinking aboutplanning for the visual arts as part of their own teaching.

Thesetwo approaches offer either too little or too much guidance from teachers. Whenteachers adopt a more moderately guided approach to supporting children’sartmaking, they co-construct understanding with children through visual mediaand support children to develop skills and confidence to use the visual arts asa tool for learning whist also maintaining children’s agency as capable andconfident learners.

Howteachers can build their confidence to plan and implement a rich visual artscurriculum

There are several ways that teacherscan build their personal confidence and pedagogical knowledge to teach thevisual arts in the early years. An important starting point is self-reflection.This could be a personal journey or part of a shared centre-wide inquiry. Reflectingabout personal history with the visual arts can enable teachers to identifywhen and how their confidence was lost in the first place. There is real valuein sharing the memories of these experiences within teaching teams. This can bean effective strategy for building a shared philosophy of the visual arts bydeciding together how the visual arts could be valued and woven into the curriculum.It is also important to have these discussions with families. Asking how thevisual arts are valued in children’s homes and cultures and inviting parentsand caregivers with visual arts expertise to spend time sharing their knowledgewith the children (and teachers) can serve to strengthen partnerships and activelyembrace multiple perspectives concerning how the visual arts can be valued.

It is vital that teachers have bothpractical and pedagogical knowledge of the visual arts. There is great value inplaying with visual arts materials before offering them to children. Teacherscould sign up to an evening class or organise a professional learning event inorder to develop new techniques or understandings of different art genres. Itis much easier to support children’s art making when you can truly empathisewith the challenges of working with different media. Teachers can then engagein authentic conversations with children about art making, which many childrenrelish[xvii]. The same can be saidfor pedagogical knowledge. Professional development that develops theoreticalunderstanding of the impacts of different teaching approaches is anothervehicle through which teachers can examine and perhaps reframe how they view childrenas learners. This in turn fundamentally impacts how they respond as teachers.

(Video) Visual Arts Course start of course webinar

How teachers can incorporate the visual arts into theirpractice

There are a number ofstrategies and practices that teachers can use to support and promotechildren’s experiences of the visual arts in their practice.

  • Spend some time in yourcentre thinking about what your visual arts environment and the materials you offercommunicate to children and families about how your centre values the visual arts. Consider whether thisis in alignment with your centre’s overarching philosophy.
  • If you decide you want to change or increase thekinds of materials you offer, consider what can be sourced for free.Rich visual arts materials don’t necessarily have to cost anything. Natural materialscan be thoughtfully collected for ephemeral art. Recycled materials can bearranged aesthetically for children to create three dimensional sculptures.
  • If you don’t have a dedicated space forvisual arts making already, think about creating one. This can be as simpleas moving the furniture around. There are significant impacts on children’scapacity to be creative for sustained periods of time when they have adedicated space for art making[xviii].
  • Think about placing visual arts materialsin other spaces throughout your centre: for example clipboards, paper andpencils in the construction area can invite children to plan their work,evaluate its success and, after a construction is completed, remember how itwas created.
  • Invite children to create visual arts ingroups based on their personal or shared interests. Stay with them, askingquestions and documenting their work and responses (with their permission).Documenting children’s visual arts is one way you can recognise and affirm thisis a domain that is valued.
  • Talk to children about their artwork, create opportunitiesfor exchange and discussion amongst children.
  • Give children opportunities to revisit theirwork. Save artwork till the next day and invite children to evaluate theirwork and decide if they would like to continue to work on it.
  • Try not to put too much emphasis onrepresentation. Children utilise a range of modes for exploration through thevisual arts. It is easy to assume they are representing ‘something’ but oftenit can be that they are engaged in aesthetic exploration instead.
  • Ensure the same materials are available forchildren each day. It can be useful to imagine the visual artsas a verbal language. To learn a language, you have to practise and practise.The visual arts require similar dedication and determination. If we wantchildren to become proficient visual arts makers, we shouldn’t change thelanguage daily[xix].Keep materials like graphite pencils out all of the time. Think about creatinga dedicated clay workshop or a print making station with space for work to bestored until the next day.
  • Finally, don’t feel afraid to createalongside children. Although you probably won’t create a masterpiece whenthe children you are working with are creating their first representationalfigures, there is great value in teachers role modelling personal enjoyment inthe visual arts. The key is to first create an environment of respect,collaboration and exchange between the children and their teachers. Oncechildren feel truly valued, they will relish opportunities to engage in playfulart making and interchange with their teachers and their peers[xx].

Endnotes

[i]Wright, S. (2007). Youngchildren’s meaning-making through drawing and ‘telling’: Analogies to filmictextual features. Australian Journal of Early Education, 32(4), 37-48.

[ii] Christensen, L. M.,& Kirkland, L. D. (2009). Early childhood visual arts curriculum: Freeingspaces to express developmental and cultural palettes of mind. ChildhoodEducation, 86(2), 87-91.

[iii]Brooks, M. (2017).Drawing to learn. InM. Narey (Ed.), Multimodal perspectives oflanguage, literacy, and learning in early childhood(pp. 25-44). Cham,Switzerland: Springer.

[iv]Clark, B., & Grey,A. (2013). Positioning the arts in early childhood education: Fostering thecreative spirit. In B. Clark, A. Grey & L. Terreni (Eds.), Kia tipu tewairua toi – fostering the creative spirit: Arts in early childhood education(pp. 87-99). Auckland, New Zealand: Pearson.

[v]Fuemana-Foa’I, L.,Pohio, L., & Terreni, L. (2009). Narratives from Aotearoa New Zealand:Building communities in early childhood through the visual arts. TeachingArtist Journal, 7(1), 23-33.

[vi]Craft, A., McConnon, L.,& Matthews, A. (2012). Child-initiated play and professional creativity:Enabling four-year-olds’ possibility thinking. Thinking Skills andCreativity, 7(1), 48-61.

[vii]Nutbrown, C. (2013).Conceptualising arts-based learning in the early years. Research Papers inEducation, 28(2), 239-263.

(Video) Practical ideas for enhancing visual arts in your centre

[viii]Kukkonen, T., &Chang‐Kredl, S. (2017). Drawing as social play: Shared meaning‐making in youngchildren’s collective drawing activities. International Journal of Art &Design Education, 37(1), 1-18.

[ix]Crafton, L., Silvers,P., & Brennan, M. (2009). Creating a critical multi-literacies curriculum:Repositioning art in the early childhood classroom. In M. Narey (Ed.), Makingmeaning: Constructing multimodal perspectives of language, literacy, andlearning through arts-based early childhood education (pp. 31-51).Pittsburgh, USA: Springer.

[x]McArdle, F. (2012). Newmaps for learning for quality art education: What pre-service teachers shouldlearn and be able to do. Australian Educational Researcher, 39(1),91-106.

[xi]Kaimal, G., Ray, K.,& Muniz, J. (2016). Reduction of cortisol levels and participants’responses following art making. Art Therapy, 33(2), 74-80.

[xii]Richards, R. (2007).Outdated relics on hallowed ground: Unearthing attitudes and beliefs about
young children’s art. Australian Journal of Early Childhood, 32(4),22-30.

[xiii]Lindsay, G. M. (2017). Artis experience: An exploration of the visual arts beliefs and pedagogy ofAustralian early childhood educators. Unpublished doctoral thesis,University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia.

[xiv] Probine, S. (2015). Thevisual arts as a tool for learning within an early childhood setting.Unpublished master’s thesis, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

[xv]McArdle (2012).

[xvi]Wright, S. (2003). Thearts, young children and learning. Boston, USA: Pearson.

(Video) Introduction to The Education Hub

[xvii]Probine (2014).

[xviii]Pairman, A. (2018). Livingin this space: Case studies of children’s lived experiences in four spatiallydiverse early childhood centres. Unpublished doctoral thesis, VictoriaUniversity, Wellington, New Zealand.

[xix]McArdle(2012).

[xx] Probine (2018).

By Sarah Probine

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An introduction to the visual arts in early childhood education - THE EDUCATION HUB (1)

(Video) Movement for Learning Q+A with Gill Connell

Sarah Probine

Sarah Probine is a senior lecturer at Manukau Institute of Technology. She teaches on the Bachelor of Education (Early childhood teaching) predominantly in the areas of the arts, creativity and inquiry-based learning. She is currently completing her PhD research. Her study has explored the contextual influences that shape how young children come to value and use the visual arts in their learning both in their early childhood centres and their home environments.

FAQs

What is visual art in early childhood? ›

Visual art is a way for children to connect, identify and construct their cultural identities through learning and activities that relate to their interests and experiences, further encouraging their development and participation in art (Fuemana-Foa'i et al., 2009; Grierson, 2011).

What is the importance of art in early childhood education? ›

Art & Literacy

Research has shown that having a child create pictures of stories they have read improves their comprehension and leaves them more motivated to read new material. By using art as an early form of communication, children are developing skills that will enhance writing expression and reflection.

What are the 5 strands of Te whāriki? ›

The five strands of Te Whāriki are Wellbeing | Mana atua, Belonging | Mana whenua, Contribution | Mana tangata, Communication | Mana reo and Exploration | Mana aotūroa. Each strand has dual English and Māori names; while closely related, different cultural connotations mean the two are not equivalents.

What is the nature and importance of visual arts in education? ›

Visual art education helps students understand basic skills like reading and writing which are crucial fundamental skills for daily life. It also helps with better communicating with others; whether it be learning another language, higher quality speech, and even better body language.

Why is visual arts important? ›

Visual art is a fundamental component of the human experience reflecting the world and the time in which we live. Art can help us understand our history, our culture, our lives, and the experience of others in a manner that cannot be achieved through other means.

What are the benefits of visual art? ›

Engaging in art forms such as painting, sculpting, and collage foster an artist's connection with their emotions, memories, and learning. Like a new physical exercise, the visual arts heal the mind by activating creative brain cells, thereby stimulating oxygenated blood flow to relatively depleted regions.

How does visual art promote creativity in children? ›

Exposure to and experience with the arts allows children to create, design, generate, and compose new ideas, further developing the creative thinking inherent in young children. If navigated intentionally, learning about color can help children develop vocabulary, complex thinking, and keen observation.

What is the role of the arts and creativity in early childhood education and care? ›

Creative and Cognitive Development.

Children learn to express their ideas and imagination through art. It encourages them to experiment with unknown materials and use new methods and techniques to achieve their desired effect. This helps boost their self confidence and decision-making skills in the future.

What are the learning benefits of art? ›

What are the Benefits of Art? Educators tell us that art encourages fine motor skills, neural development, and problem-solving abilities and that it can be used effectively to teach and understand other key subjects such as reading, writing, math, and science.

What are the 4 principles of Te Whariki? ›

Te Whāriki is based on the aspirations that children grow up:
  • as competent and confident learners and communicators.
  • healthy in mind, body and spirit.
  • secure in their sense of belonging.
  • secure in the knowledge that they make a valued contribution to society.

Is Te Whariki a play based curriculum? ›

Learning through play is also called play-based learning. Learning through play forms the pedagogical foundation of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum.

What strategies you might use to promote children's interest play and learning? ›

“Some of these strategies may include:
  • Engaging with scaffolding.
  • Learning through questioning.
  • Challenging individual children's abilities and knowledge.
  • Researching and learning together.
  • Actively listening.
  • Strategically planning.
  • Revising on all learning experiences.”
26 May 2021

Does visual and performing arts play an important role in student development? ›

Visual and Performing Arts are a vitally important link to increased academic success through the advancement of a child's creativity, language and motor skills, critical thinking, and cultural awareness.”

How can visual arts be used in the classroom? ›

Here are a few simple ways I integrate the arts in my classroom:
  1. VISUAL ARTS.
  2. Encourage speaking, listening, and vocabulary development skills. ...
  3. Clarify thoughts, ideas, and feelings by drawing and labeling.
  4. Go deeper in units of study. ...
  5. DRAMA.
  6. Encourage role playing. ...
  7. Take turns in the "hot seat" to understand character.
17 May 2013

What are the roles of the visual arts in enhancing the learning process? ›

Learning in the domain of visual art, in particular, is reliant on a complex system of perceptual, higher cognitive, and motor functions, suggesting a shared neural substrate and strong potential for cross-cognitive transfer in learning and creativity.

What is visual art in your own words? ›

The visual arts are art forms that create works that are primarily visual in nature, such as ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, design, crafts, photography, video, film making and architecture.

What is the characteristics of visual arts? ›

General characteristics of Visual art/Fundamentals of Visual art : Space, form, size, shape, line, colour texture, tonal values, perspective, design and aesthetic organization of visual elements in art object (composition). The uses of two and three dimensions in visual art.

What is visual art and examples? ›

For copyright purposes, visual arts are original pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works, which include two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of fine, graphic, and applied art. Examples of visual arts works: Advertisements, commercial prints, labels. Artificial flowers and plants.

Why is visual arts good for children? ›

Visual art does not have boundaries. It enables people to play with materials, to express their thinking, to problem solve and make sense of emotions," Dr Lindsay says. "For children, art is a way to communicate their ideas.

What is meant by visual art in education? ›

Visual arts education is the area of learning that is based upon the kind of art that one can see, visual arts—drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, and design in jewelry, pottery, weaving, fabrics, etc.

What are the types of visual art? ›

The visual arts are art forms such as painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, photography, video, filmmaking, design, crafts and architecture. Many artistic disciplines such as performing arts, conceptual art, and textile arts also involve aspects of visual arts as well as arts of other types.

What skills does art develop? ›

Skills developed through participation in the arts are increasingly important in the workplace and therefore, key to a successful career.
  • CREATIVITY. ...
  • CONFIDENCE. ...
  • PROBLEM SOLVING.
  • PERSEVERANCE. ...
  • FOCUS. ...
  • NON-VERBAL.
  • RECEIVING.
  • COLLABORATION DEVELOPING.

How can you encourage creativity in the art classroom? ›

3 Ways to Teach for Creativity in the Classroom
  1. Scaffold the Skills You Want to See. Teaching for creativity is something high school art teacher, Melissa Purtee, takes very seriously. ...
  2. Allow Your Students Time to Play. ...
  3. Normalize Failure in the Classroom. ...
  4. Help Your Students See the Value of Process.
6 Jun 2018

What is the role of teacher in teaching art? ›

Art teachers instruct students how to produce, appreciate, and understand the fine arts. Like teachers in other fields, they develop teaching outlines and lesson plans, give lectures, facilitate discussions and activities, keep class attendance records, assign homework, and evaluate student progress.

How the arts and creativity enhance children's healthy development and learning? ›

Art can help children learn and practice skills like patterning and cause and effect (i.e., “If I push very hard with a crayon the color is darker.”). They can also practice critical thinking skills by making a mental plan or picture of what they intend to create and following through on their plan.

What is creative arts in early childhood education? ›

Creative arts are activities that actively engage children's imagination through music, visual arts, movement and dance, and drama and storytelling. Creative arts engage children across all domains—cognitive, language, social, emotional, and physical.

What role can arts culture and creativity in education play to enhance the skills of the workforce? ›

“The fine arts also provide learners with non-academic benefits such as promoting self-esteem, motivation, aesthetic awareness, cultural exposure, creativity, improved emotional expression, as well as social harmony and appreciation of diversity.”

Why is art so important? ›

Art can communicate information, shape our everyday lives, make a social statement and be enjoyed for aesthetic beauty.

How can creative art activities help children's creativity development? ›

Emotional Development

Through creative art, children may be able to represent experiences that they cannot verbalize. They may draw pictures out of proportion, exaggerating things that are important to them. When we value children's creativity, we help them feel valued as people, raising their self-esteem.

What age group is te whāriki used with? ›

The content is age appropriate for three different age groups: infants (birth to eighteen months), toddlers (one to three years) and young children (three years to school-entry age). The name 'Te Whāriki' comes from the Maori language and means 'woven mat'.

Is Te Whariki mandatory? ›

The national curriculum, Te Whāriki, is mandatory in all ECEC settings for children 0 to 5 years. The monitoring of service quality is closely linked to this curriculum framework.

How many learning outcomes are there in Te whāriki? ›

The 20 learning outcomes incorporate aspects of the learning dispositions (“ready, willing, and able”) and working theories that children need to be competent and confident lifelong learners.

What is the purpose of the curriculum in early childhood education? ›

WHYis curriculum important? It's important because it clearly describes what you want children to learn; what child outcomes you are aiming for. Curriculum describes the sequence - the “what comes next” for the child to learn and you to teach so that the child moves closer to your intended learning outcome.

Why is play-based learning so important? ›

Play-based learning helps children develop social skills, motivation to learn, and even language and numeracy skills. Taking initiative, focused attention, and curiosity about the world are all a part of play. Children are naturally wired to do the very thing that will help them learn and grow.

What are some examples of play-based learning? ›

To get you started here are seven play-based learning activities to do with your child.
  • Play with a toy farm or house. ...
  • Make something together in the kitchen. ...
  • Get rolling with play dough. ...
  • Play along. ...
  • Discover the outdoors. ...
  • Get sensory. ...
  • Read together.
10 Dec 2015

How can educators create an effective play environment for children in your care? ›

These include:
  1. Spaces to enable quality interactions with educators and children.
  2. Areas for exploration and investigation.
  3. Group spaces and areas for children to explore creativity.
  4. Spaces for relaxation.
  5. Zones for rough and tumble play.
  6. Welcoming spaces for families.
  7. Opportunity for risk-taking and challenge.
17 Feb 2020

What techniques do you use to encourage and support children's participation? ›

15 tips for how to encourage kids to participate
  • Get to the root. Start a discussion with your child so you can uncover what might be holding him back. ...
  • Be a role model. ...
  • Gather a group. ...
  • Pair up siblings. ...
  • Start slowly. ...
  • Give her an out. ...
  • Dig deep. ...
  • Go with her.
10 Dec 2015

What strategies does the educator use to keep children engaged and responsive? ›

Encourage back-and-forth exchanges.

Tune into children's interests and experiences and talk about them. Take turns communicating. Show that you are interested in what they are doing and listening to what they say. Provide time for children to respond.

What are the needs and importance of visual arts? ›

Visual art is a fundamental component of the human experience reflecting the world and the time in which we live. Art can help us understand our history, our culture, our lives, and the experience of others in a manner that cannot be achieved through other means.

What are the purposes roles and functions of visual arts in society? ›

Creating art fosters creativity, originality and imagination, which are important to innovation, societal advances and scientific discoveries. Visual artists lead the way by continually coming up with new and exciting art forms, techniques and imagery that may delight, shock or disturb.

Why should students take performing arts? ›

Performing Arts allows children to be themselves, to be confident in who they are. The skills they learn at Stagecoach are not only fun and engaging but provide children with experience and the key life skills such as confidence and discipline to help them succeed in life.

What strategies and activities would you use to teach in art? ›

Here are six strategies for arts integration in education to add to your lesson plans today.
  • Act It Out. ...
  • Make Collages and Models. ...
  • Use Drawings and Illustrations. ...
  • Turn Fractions Into Music. ...
  • Tell Picture Stories. ...
  • Memorize Through Song. ...
  • Follow These Strategies for Arts Integration in Education Across Subjects.
19 Feb 2021

How can creative arts be used in the classroom to differentiate student learning? ›

Each art form taps into those multiple intelligences and can easily be used to differentiate instruction. A great way to use arts integration to differentiate instruction in a regular classroom is to allow students to choose an art form to present their learning.

What are the correct examples of learning through art? ›

Learners explore creatively while building connections between different concepts through various art forms. Art experiences, both in visual (drawing and painting, clay modelling, pottery, paper crafts, mask and puppet making, heritage crafts etc.) and performing arts (music, dance, theatre, puppetry etc.)

What is the main focus of visual arts? ›

Visual arts – class of art forms, including painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking and others, that focus on the creation of works which are primarily visual in nature.

Why are visual and performance arts important in education? ›

“Visual and Performing Arts are a vitally important link to increased academic success through the advancement of a child's creativity, language and motor skills, critical thinking, and cultural awareness.”

What is meant by visual art? ›

The visual arts are art forms that create works that are primarily visual in nature, such as ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, design, crafts, photography, video, film making and architecture.

What is visual art and examples? ›

For copyright purposes, visual arts are original pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works, which include two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of fine, graphic, and applied art. Examples of visual arts works: Advertisements, commercial prints, labels. Artificial flowers and plants.

What is visual arts in kindergarten? ›

Visual Arts

Students perceive and respond to works of art, objects in nature, events, and the environment. They also use the vocabulary of the visual arts to express their observations. 1.1 Recognize and describe simple patterns found in the environment and works of art.

Why is visual literacy important in early childhood? ›

Access to a visual metalanguage will enable students and teachers to accurately and consistently talk about how meaning is made in visual texts, in the same way that we use a commonly understood grammar of language to talk about meaning making in written and spoken texts.

What are 3 types of visual art? ›

While the fine arts as a collective can include seven forms of art, the fine visual arts are traditionally limited to three visual arts: painting, sculpture, and architecture. However, broader interpretations of the fine visual arts would expand to include drawing.

What are the types of visual art? ›

The visual arts are art forms such as painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, photography, video, filmmaking, design, crafts and architecture. Many artistic disciplines such as performing arts, conceptual art, and textile arts also involve aspects of visual arts as well as arts of other types.

What is the characteristics of visual arts? ›

General characteristics of Visual art/Fundamentals of Visual art : Space, form, size, shape, line, colour texture, tonal values, perspective, design and aesthetic organization of visual elements in art object (composition). The uses of two and three dimensions in visual art.

What are the four categories of visual art? ›

There are different types of visual art, including film-making, sculpture, painting, and photography.

What is the purpose of art? ›

Art can uplift, provoke, soothe, entertain and educate us and is an important part of our lives. At its most profound level, it takes us from the everyday to a place of introspection and contemplation, to see the bigger picture of the human condition.

What are the 3 definition of art? ›

The definition of art has generally fallen into three categories: representation, expression, and form. Art as Representation or Mimesis. Plato first developed the idea of art as “mimesis,” which, in Greek, means copying or imitation.

What skills does art develop? ›

Skills developed through participation in the arts are increasingly important in the workplace and therefore, key to a successful career.
  • CREATIVITY. ...
  • CONFIDENCE. ...
  • PROBLEM SOLVING.
  • PERSEVERANCE. ...
  • FOCUS. ...
  • NON-VERBAL.
  • RECEIVING.
  • COLLABORATION DEVELOPING.

How does visual art promote creativity in children? ›

Exposure to and experience with the arts allows children to create, design, generate, and compose new ideas, further developing the creative thinking inherent in young children. If navigated intentionally, learning about color can help children develop vocabulary, complex thinking, and keen observation.

How do you prepare an art presentation? ›

Ten tips for giving effective art history presentations
  1. Have a special script ready. You should not read your academic paper verbatim. ...
  2. Engage your audience. ...
  3. Know how slides and script interact. ...
  4. Organize your slides well. ...
  5. Select quality images. ...
  6. Black on back, and simple is good. ...
  7. Limit your text on screen. ...
  8. Less is more.

What are the benefits of visual literacy? ›

According to researchers, educators, museum professionals, filmmakers, and artists, visual literacy can improve one's creativity, critical thinking, educational achievement, empathy towards others, and ability to decipher technology.

Can visual literacy help for the effective learning of students how? ›

Seeing all the little clues, and then sharing what they see and why they think it's happening, makes visual literacy exciting for students. It unlocks all facets of literacy and allows learners to gain deeper understanding and a different perspective of the story that goes beyond information that just comes from text.

How do you develop visual literacy skills among learners? ›

Try some of these techniques to get your students thinking about images as well as the texts they read:
  1. Picture analysis. Before reading a book or a chapter, talk about the picture on the cover or at the beginning. ...
  2. Note sketching. ...
  3. Take a color test. ...
  4. Insert memes.
26 Feb 2019

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